3 steps to a safe and sound girls night out

 Girls nights out are the best nights out.

Girls nights out are the best nights out.

No matter how careful we are, I’m sure the vast majority of people who read this can sympathise with losing a phone, bank card or ID while on a night out. It’s frustrating and can cause so much inconvenience. However, it’s when we start losing our friends that it gets serious.

It’s thought that in the past year, approximately 40% of women have been separated from their friends on a night out. On most occasions this has not led to anything more than a few phone calls to find one another again, but it’s best to avoid this situation altogether. We’ve outlined 3 simple steps to help you stay safe when out with your friends:

 If you see any suspicious behaviour, call the British Transport Police

If you see any suspicious behaviour, call the British Transport Police

  1. Agree amongst yourselves where you’re going before you head out and make everyone aware if the plan changes. It’s also wise to tell those who aren’t joining you such as your parents/ housemates where you’ll be and to give an approximate time as to when you’ll be home.

  2. While out and about, we recommend you go to the toilets/ outside in pairs but remember never to leave your drink unattended. It’s a good idea to keep in touch via a group chat and choose a place to congregate if a friend does get separated from the group.

  3. Try and organise your transport in advance, whether that be what time train you’ll catch home or booking a licensed taxi. If you’re walking or getting the bus, travel along busy routes where there is lots of people and traffic. Make sure to download the One Scream app as a final safeguard against danger. If you panic scream - a louder, more complex sound than any other - the app detects it and sends a message with your location to whoever you choose for support. More info can be found on the One Scream website.

Stay safe out there and remember to look out for one another. If you see a women in distress, seek help or call 999 in an emergency.

Lucy Britton